Redefine Play: How Your Mindset Dictates Your Success

In New York City, there is a very defined “work hard, play hard,” mentality. People are drawn to this city because of it’s hustle culture. Everyone comes here with a dream, a vision they don’t stop working toward until they reach it. With this stigma comes the need for a release, whether that means popping bottles at the club or spending your evenings in swanky lounges until the sun comes up

Some believe that every small accomplishment deserves a celebration. While yes that is completely true in the sense of looking back to see how far you’ve come, and using it as momentum to get to the next level, that does not, however, give you an excuse to go out of control all of the time. It’ll turn into a vicious, never-ending cycle. (And people wonder why everyone in this city is single!

People always ask me why I work so hard. They say I’ve reached a level of success and I deserve to let loose every once in a while. The truth is, our definition of success is very different. I’m working this hard right now so I don’t have to in the next 5 years. I want to work hard now, and play later. I don’t mean play as in clubbing every weekend, I mean play as in traveling the world and doing things to fulfill my mind, body and soul.

I would rather spend my weekends turning my hobby and my passion into a career and creating a life I don’t crave a vacation away from. I would rather spend my limited free time with people interested in changing the world and building connections with purposeful people.

The key is to never be the most successful person in the room. Why, you ask? How is being the most successful person in the room beneficial to your own, personal growth? How are you supposed to learn when you’re already seemingly at the top?

I remember when I was younger and taking violin lessons, each week we had a group class where we would play all of the songs in our particular level. We would play the songs we knew, and sit out and listen for the ones we didn’t know. When you got to the end of a level, you essentially played the entire group class because you knew all of the songs. Those who didn’t know the songs, would look up to you because they were waiting for the day they’d be in your shoes. I admit, I felt cool being one of the few kids who knew all of the songs, but what I really loved was when I would go to the next level group class and only know 1 or 2 songs. It was so motivating to sit there and listen to the older kids perform. I knew that if I worked hard, I would soon be one of them. Being the small fish in that pond motivated me to practice and become the best violinist I could be.

Does it all make sense now? When you are continuously learning and focusing on becoming a better mentor, better businesswoman and better overall human being, your mindset shifts. You only want to occupy your time with things that make you better and are beneficial to you and your life. It’s fine if some people aren’t on the same page as you, or they don’t agree with your mindset. Those types of people are not meant to be in your life. Anyone who is not on your level mentally will start to drift away. Only those who are meant to fly with you, will stay.

 

Photo Credit: Owin Pierson

Comments

  1. Wendy

    Thank you Lauren – to learn these life lessons at such a young age is the greatest blessing of all…

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